Natural-Habitats
organic products grown in a sustainable habitat

Mainstream Sustainable Palm Oil Production in Ecuador

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07 August 2015

farmers, environment, partnership, social reponsibility

Mainstream Sustainable Palm Oil Production in Ecuador

Deforestation caused by many palm-oil producers, harming wildlife habitats, has been a widespread concern around the world. However, more and more palm oil is now being sourced sustainably with a help of the certification initiative promoted by a non-profit association Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) that aims to transform markets to make sustainable palm oil the norm. Natural Habitats as 100% organic and sustainable producer was certified with RSPO standard in 2013.

In May 2013, Natural Habitats in Ecuador (Exportsustent) together with Solidaridad and National Association of Oil Palm Growers (ANCUPA) developed a pioneering project Mainstream Sustainable Palm Oil Production in Ecuador. This two years initiative was started with a great ambition to accelerate the sustainable production of palm oil in the country through trainings in good agriculture practices and RSPO principles. Two objectives were set for this project:

RSPO Assessment: compliance and audit of 93 farmers by Exportsustent and Palma Organica.
Training of 780 smallholder farmers provided by ANCUPA.
The first objective of the project has been exceeded. To this point, 98 farmers have been RSPO certified in 3916,13 ha. A group of 21 farmers in 850 ha is ready for certification and a new audit is scheduled for September 15th, 2015. This brings a total of 119 farmers in 4766,13 ha complying with the RSPO standards.

For Natural Habitats, to become the first company certified with RSPO in the country demanded a lot of effort, teamwork, and attention to details. The development of action plans to bring the standards into achievable and reachable tasks, together with highly skilled professionals allowed the organization not only to achieve the objectives proposed for this project, but also to go further. Agro-forestry, biodiversity enhancement combined with organic production practices, is the next step for already RSPO certified farmers.

The second objective has also been reached before the end of the project. ANCUPA continually supports farmers in the process toward RSPO certification. The trainings have been divided into three modules, covering main principles of the certification standards, good agriculture practices, environmental aspects, industrial safety, social issues and economic viability. To this point, 1385 smallholder farmers have been coached in the country and ANCUPA does not stop on these achievements. The organization continues to support and educate farmers toward sustainable production of palm oil.

For Natural Habitats, this project represents a very important learning experience, and provides us with tools and knowledge on how to bring to mainstream our certification process. We optimistically look to the future and in the next two years we are planning to add 200 new farmers into our RSPO certification.

 

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Mainstream Sustainable Palm Oil Production in Ecuador

Deforestation caused by many palm-oil producers, harming wildlife habitats, has been a widespread concern around the world. However, more and more palm oil is now being sourced sustainably with a help of the certification initiative promoted by a non-profit association Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) that aims to transform markets to make sustainable palm oil the norm. Natural Habitats as 100% organic and sustainable producer was certified with RSPO standard in 2013.

In May 2013, Natural Habitats in Ecuador (Exportsustent) together with Solidaridad and National Association of Oil Palm Growers (ANCUPA) developed a pioneering project Mainstream Sustainable Palm Oil Production in Ecuador

farmers, environment, partnership, social reponsibility

An Ongoing Education of Farmers

Natural Habitats believes in doing business in harmony with the environment. This is the reason for us to continuously encourage smallholder farmers in Ecuador and Sierra Leone into getting involved in organic and sustainable production of palm oil.

On a regular basis, we educate and train our smallholder farmers in nature preservation and organic farming practices for not only their own good but for the betterment of the society

farmers, partnership, social reponsibility

PC Affecting Ecuador Oil Palm Plantations

Bud rot disease or PC (pudrición del cogollo) has adversely affected some of the palm oil plantations in Ecuador, the country where Natural Habitats Group is working with small farm holders to produce organic and sustainable palm oil.
It is estimated that 5% of the Latin America’s total palm oil trees have been killed due to the spread of PC

environment, farmers, partnership, social reponsibility

We Generate Employment in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone is considered one of the poorest countries in the world, it ranked 180th out of 187 countries on the Human Development Index 2011 . A large proportion of the youth in the country are unemployed or underemployed which presents a threat to sustainable peace and growth of the country. The recent Ebola outbreak has further worsen the economic situation of the country and had an acute repercussion on the employment and hence on the food security of the population

farmers, partnership, social reponsibility

We Train Smallholder Farmers of Sierra Leone in Organic Farming

Oil palm trees are native to Sierra Leone, farmers have been traditionally growing oil palm trees as an intercrop in small-scale farming systems. Natural Habitats believe in doing business in harmony with the environment and this is the reason for us to continuously encourage our smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone to get involved in organic and more sustainable production of palm oil.

We regularly educate and train our smallholder farmers in organic farming practices and nature preservation for not only their own good but for the betterment of the society

environment, partnership, social reponsibility, farmers

Our Palm Oil Production Resumed in Sierra Leone

Natural Habitats has been working with more than 1000 smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone to ultimately produce organic and fairtrade palm oil. Last year we were forced to stop all our operations because of the devastating Ebola outbreak in the country.

We are now glad to announce that Natural Habitats has fully resumed all its operations in Sierra Leone. Our mill and collection points are operative and our local team is more committed than ever to the production of socially and environmentally sustainable palm oil

environment, farmers, partnership, social reponsibility

Integrated Pest Management - Our Sustainable Practice

Natural Habitats group produces 100% organic palm oil in a sustainable habitat. Through a vertically integrated supply chain we produce, collect, process and trade only organic and sustainable palm oil, which allows us to use only organic and sustainable production practices in order to ensure a reliable supply chain from ‘Farmer to Fork’.

Farmers have been growing food with conventional agricultural techniques, fertilizers and pesticides for many years

environment, farmers, partnership

Carbon Sequestration Is Integrated Into Our Business Model

Natural Habitats business model in Ecuador and Sierra Leone aims at complete social inclusion and biodiversity enhancement by preserving forest. The group works with small farm holders and only uses organic agriculture practices that prohibit the clearing of primary eco-systems and mitigates some of the effects of climate change.

In most part of the world palm oil production is dominated with water and ground pollution and loss of biodiversity due to green house emission from deforestation

farmers, environment, partnership, social reponsibility, health

Our Support Initiative to Fight Ebola

Natural Habitats Group is fully committed to social development as its core value. The group has started a support initiative for the people of Sierra Leone to help them fight the deadly virus of Ebola.

The virus is highly infectious in nature; health workers and the family members of the infected people are at most risk

farmers, health, partnership, social reponsibility